//Prime minister-elect announces list of ministers

Prime minister-elect announces list of ministers

Tunisian Prime Minister-elect Elyes Fakhfakh met with Tunisian President Kais Saied on Thursday and then announced his government team, composed of 29 ministers, two undersecretaries, and a special minister for large projects, distributed among party members and independents.
The composition is a slightly revised and corrected version of the one presented last Saturday.
Some parties had objections to that composition, particularly the Islamic – TUNIS, FEBRUARY 20 – Tunisian Prime Minister-elect Elyes Fakhfakh met with Tunisian President Kais Saied on Thursday and then announced his government team, composed of 29 ministers, two undersecretaries, and a special minister for large projects, distributed among party members and independents.
The composition is a slightly revised and corrected version of the one presented last Saturday.
Some parties had objections to that composition, particularly the Islamic Ennhadha party, the top party in Parliament with 54 seats, which is asking for a more inclusive government.
On Thursday the parliamentary president’s office will set the date for a confidence vote.
“The various political parties have shown great class and have put the national interest first,” Fakhfakh said in a brief statement.
“The government will bring together a large political coalition and will be able to count both on great abilities as well as political personalities, but above all it aims to give stability to the country and will be able to give back trust and hope to Tunisians,” he said.
After more than three weeks of consultations to form his team with the broadest consensus possible, Fakhfakh must now surpass the minimum threshold of 109 votes to win a confidence vote in Parliament.
While Ennhadha, with seven places on the team, has already said it will vote yes, the party Qalb Tounes, which has no ministers on the team, has said it will decide how it will vote following an official meeting of its leaders.
The Tunisian Parliament that resulted from the elections last October is a fragmented one, and with no political power surpassing 25% of the consensus, alliances are essential. Ennhadha party, the top party in Parliament with 54 seats, which is asking for a more inclusive government.
On Thursday the parliamentary president’s office will set the date for a confidence vote.
“The various political parties have shown great class and have put the national interest first,” Fakhfakh said in a brief statement.
“The government will bring together a large political coalition and will be able to count both on great abilities as well as political personalities, but above all it aims to give stability to the country and will be able to give back trust and hope to Tunisians,” he said.
After more than three weeks of consultations to form his team with the broadest consensus possible, Fakhfakh must now surpass the minimum threshold of 109 votes to win a confidence vote in Parliament.
While Ennhadha, with seven places on the team, has already said it will vote yes, the party Qalb Tounes, which has no ministers on the team, has said it will decide how it will vote following an official meeting of its leaders.
The Tunisian Parliament that resulted from the elections last October is a fragmented one, and with no political power surpassing 25% of the consensus, alliances are essential.